Tag Archives: Sackville

Community Herald: SHS HOPES TO DOUBLE DONATION FOR IWK

From human-hungry-hippos, to flash mobs, students and teachers at Sackville High School are pumping-up the energy and fundraising initiatives in the lead-up to their annual SHS Dance Marathon for the IWK.

Music students Matt Hustins Macdonald, Brandon Romans, Daniel Winters and Riley Prince-Gorman compose the theme song, Strength In Numbers, for this year’s six hour SHS Dance Marathon on Apr. 16, with inspiration from Mike Ryan of The Town Heroes. (L-R)
Music students Matt Hustins Macdonald, Brandon Romans, Daniel Winters and Riley Prince-Gorman compose the theme song, Strength In Numbers, for this year’s six hour SHS Dance Marathon on Apr. 16, with inspiration from Mike Ryan of The Town Heroes. (L-R) Hear their song below.

The countdown has begun for the big event, which will host dancers and teams from 18 schools in Halifax Regional Municipality and takes place on April 16 from 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. at SHS.

“We’re challenging each student to raise $50 … and if 1,000 of our participants raise $50 we will reach our $50,000 goal for the IWK,” says Lara Fawthrop, SHS music teacher.

Dance Marathon in aid of Children’s Miracle Hospitals initiated a number of years ago, but only recently came to Canada, says Marilyn MacGibbon, vice-principal at SHS. Last year the school exceeded by more than double it’s fundraising goal, raising an excess of $20,000.

“We were one of the first schools to really embrace it … and we were the most successful school last year, so this year we’ve raised our fundraising goal to $50,000,” says MacGibbon.

Full Story Here.

Down the hall, local award-winning musician Mike Ryan from The Town Heroes kicked back with five music students to compose an original piece of music for the upcoming event. “It’s a positive song geared at getting the kids excited,” says Ryan.

The five students are excited to perform the original piece, entitled “Strength In Numbers,” and The Town Heroes will perform for about an hour during the SHS Dance Marathon.  While Grade 12 percussionist Matt Hustins Macdonald says he can’t dance, he plans to put his talent to good use. “Its good for me to use what I’m good at and be able to help out … there’s always something you can do,” says Hustins Macdonald.

Music student Daniel Winters plays piano in the school band and says he’s proud to be contributing to the marathon.

“And when I’m not playing, I’ll be dancing for the kids who can’t,” says Winters, drawing inspiration from the song lyrics.

Doherty says she is emotionally invested in the event and sparking new ways to get the students involved, such as putting teachers on skateboards and having students manoeuvre them as human-hungry-hippos. With laundry hampers in hand, students donated $120 to watch the teachers attempt to capture 1,300 plastic balls rolling throughout the school lobby.

On March 31, Grade 11 student Marley Repchull led supporters in a flash mob Morale Dance, while other students were ‘bringing home the bacon.’

Elicia Taylor, Jennah Fiske, Keegan Pettipas-Repchull and Marley Repchull are ‘bringing home the bacon’ along with fellow Sackville High School students, fundraising for SHS Dance Marathon on Apr. 16, where 18 schools in HRM will dance for six hours in aid of IWK hospital. (L-R)
Elicia Taylor, Jennah Fiske, Keegan Pettipas-Repchull and Marley Repchull are ‘bringing home the bacon’ along with fellow Sackville High School students, fundraising for SHS Dance Marathon on Apr. 16, where 18 schools in HRM will dance for six hours in aid of IWK hospital. (L-R)

“It’s a play on a piggybank,” says Doherty.

“Our co-president Sam Butler brought in $100 in nickels,” says Grade 11 student Elicia Taylor. “Whoever has the heaviest donation gets to donate the sum of the donations in their own name (to help reach their individual fundraising goal),”says Taylor.

A wise strategist, Butler changed her $100 in fundraising to heavy, five cent nickels, weighing-in at 50 lbs. and registering an error on the scale.

“The Morale Dance takes place (during the dance marathon) at the top of every hour to announce the next miracle kid, so it’s our pump-up song,” says Doherty. “We’ve got five kids coming from the IWK and at the top of every hour they take the stage and they tell their story. Our kids take a knee (kneel on one knee) and listen to the children’s stories.”

“Overall, the event shows the kids that there are people who have overcome greater challenges than they could ever imagine happening in their own lives,” says MacGibbon.

“We want to help the IWK continue to do the amazing work they do,” smiles Doherty.

Donations to support the event can be made through the school or at SHS Dance Marathon on www.helpmakemiracles.ca. For Dancer and Team Registration visit the school’s website.

Community Herald: Get the ‘get-up’ muscles with older adult fitness

Sandy Johnson (purple T-shirt) actively participates in Norma Hustins’ older adult fitness classes in Sackville three times a week and says, “it’s never too late to get active, whether you’re 55 or 85-years-old.”
Sandy Johnson (purple T-shirt) actively participates in Norma Hustins’ older adult fitness classes in Sackville three times a week and says, “it’s never too late to get active, whether you’re 55 or 85-years-old.”

“It’s the best kept secret in Sackville,” says Ruth Baxter (73), lifting her quads and pumping her arms inwards and outwards during Norma J. Hustins older adult fitness class.

Baxter, crippled by a virus a few years ago, says she feels better when she does the classes. “Anyone can do it … there are women here between 50 and 80-years-old.”

Joan Richardson says she was skeptical she wouldn't be able to do the exercises having lost part of her leg to cancer. "I can do almost everything here."
Joan Richardson says she was skeptical she wouldn’t be able to do the exercises having lost part of her leg to cancer. “I can do almost everything here.”

Foot cancer caused Joan Richardson to have her leg amputated below the knee almost 20-years-ago. Richardson lives in Bedford and began the older adult fitness classes in 2012. She says she was skeptical she wouldn’t be able to do the exercises. “I can do almost everything here,” she says, not missing a beat while Hustins belts out instructions to 50 women at Stone Ridge Fellowship in Sackville.

“She does a lot of arm exercises and lot of working the big muscle in the rear, so you can get yourself up off of chairs … its good for seniors because you need to be able to get yourself up and be able to walk well,” says Richardson.

Norma J. Hustins leads a class of more than 50 older adult women and says "You're never to old to move your body ... you're never to old to do something to help maintain your independence."
Norma J. Hustins leads a class of more than 50 older adult women and says “You’re never to old to move your body … you’re never to old to do something to help maintain your independence.”

Hustins has taught this group of women for eight years and says she saw a need to get older adults moving. “It’s fun, it’s social, but the key factor is all of this is helping women maintain their independence,” says Hustins, a nutritional consultant and older adult fitness instructor.

“Once we lose our get-up muscles, we lose our independence.” She says she works the ladies hard, focusing on range of motion and balance exercises.

For the complete story click here.

Hustins class takes place Mon., Wed., and Fri. mornings at 11 a.m. at Stone Ridge Fellowship in Sackville.

For information on classes at Sackville Seniors Centre call 902-864 5591 or email kenmark20@hotmail.com.

Community Herald: The big and small of childcare

Entrusting a child into daycare or family-run childcare can be a daunting experience for parents. Researching available choices can help navigate these waters, finding the best option to fit the needs of every family.

Angie Bryant knows the benefits of both larger childcare centres and smaller family-run facilities. Bryant is executive director of Fox Hollow Child Care Centre and Family Home Agency in Upper Tantallon.

“For a stay-at-home mom who wants to mind other children along with her own, she doesn’t have get licensing through Department of Education and Early Childhood Development services,” says Bryant — a former EPA — provided they don’t exceed six children.

Family Home Day Care Programs provide care options for children from birth to school age, in a home monitored by a regulated family home daycare agency.

Community Herald interviewed early childcare workers in Dartmouth, Sackville, Prospect Bay and Upper Tantallon.  For a look at childcare options, big and small, read the full story in today’s Community Herald.

“Most families of preschool-age children between three and five-years-old, want to know their children are being prepared for going into primary school … they want to know if a facility offers a school readiness program, and our answer to parents is yes,” says Barb Wade, director at the Sackville location of Adventurers Child Care Centre.

Community Herald: SWAT a splash for success

SWAT Coach Ryan Laustsen gives stroke technique instructions during a summer camp at Sackville Sports Stadium. A second Skill Development camp will run Aug. 18 - 22.
SWAT Coach Ryan Laustsen gives stroke technique instructions during a summer camp at Sackville Sports Stadium. A second Skill Development camp will run Aug. 18 – 22.

Community swim team training Nova Scotia’s next great competitive swimmers

Swimmers work their techniques, arching their back just the right way and pointing their toes outwards to master the front crawl, as SWAT team coaches Heidi Miller and Ryan Laustsen are on the sun-flooded deck at Sackville Sports Stadium pool during a Skills Development camp.

Sackville Waves Aquatic Team dares swimmers to be awesome, according to their website logo and SWAT president Peter Bush says the team is training future Olympians and Nova Scotia’s next great competitive swimmers.

“The team won two provincial championships for top team by Age Group and Novatech, to add to the two championships in 2013 and three medals at the last Canada Games,” says Bush.

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For the full story, Click.

SWAT is accepting swimmers across a variety of ages in September for the 2014/15 swim season.  Details can be found on www.swatswim.wordpress.com

 

Community Herald: Service learning: A hands-on game changer

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“You get to help other people and build skills … it’s school but it’s not like school, it’s really fun,” says Colleyne McDonald (R) with fellow Halifax West O2 student Sara Macdonald (L) showcasing dollhouses to be donated to IWK Children’s Hospital.

Students are getting their hands dirty, constructing confidence and community links through service learning and real life opportunities.

Service Learning Week began June 2, when students across Nova Scotia showcased projects focused around community engagement and tangible outcomes.

Grade 10 students at Halifax West High School built 10 ornately detailed dollhouses to donate to IWK children’s hospital as part of their project.

“There were some ups and downs and some parts were frustrating,” said Sara Macdonald. “The shingles were a struggle.”

… But one of the key ‘game changers’ is getting the message to parents about what the program is about says Shane Shaw, O2 coordinator at Millwood High School in Sackville. “It’s not only about trades.”

For the complete story see Community Herald.

Bowling for futures: Building Futures Charlie Dunn Bowl-a-thon

Bowlathon2The annual Charlie-Dunn Bowl-a-thon Fundraiser took place this weekend at Sackville’s spectacular Super Bowl.  It was their biggest turn out ever and it was a great day!

Event organizers Sarah Hunt and Jennifer Pauley
Event organizers Sarah Hunt and Jennifer Pauley

We can’t wait to hear what they raised, and are really proud of our eight young gals who fundraised over $1,000 in support of Building Futures Employment Society to help work towards a society where students with intellectual disabilities don’t graduate to wait lists and have equal access to supported employment.

The girls want to thank their two local sponsors: TD Canada Trust and Subway, Cobequid and for pledging their big day!

High score kids bowler went to Fantabulous Four’s Autumn Sweeney and most sportsmanlike went to Ally Cat Striker’s Erin Strite. Well done girls!Autumn & Eri

The Building Futures Employment Society (formerly Anchor) have held a bowl-a-thon for more than 10 years to raise money to support our programs such as literacy, job readiness, and employment support.

“The Charlie Dunn Bowl-A-Thon is a community event that is a fun opportunity for the FUTURES team and our community to join together to support services that engage people with intellectual disabilities in employment and other community options,” says Marilyn Forrest, Director, Building Futures Employment Society.

The Bowl-A-Thon was renamed in 2011 in honour of Charlie Dunn. Charlie was part of the FUTURES team for many years. He was a friend and mentor to everyone with whom he worked. He believed in what we do and promoted us in the local community. Charlie was our most enthusiastic and committed fundraiser. He was in many ways the face of FUTURES in our community.