Tag Archives: Lower Sackville

Community Herald: Baseball without borders

 

Ambassadors for baseball in Nova Scotia, children from Fall River, Sackville, Hammonds Plains and Halifax are excited for the 2015 Canada - Cuba Goodwill Tour in Feb. Rachel Crawford, Emily MacFadyen, Lauren Sweet, Grace Hartling, Emilie Leger and Erin Cowan (Back Row L-R). Camden Rendell, Kyle Hunt, Ryan Trenholm and Emily Cahill (Front Row L-R)  Photo: Cyndi Sweeney
Ambassadors for baseball in Nova Scotia, children from Fall River, Sackville, Hammonds Plains and Halifax are excited for the 2015 Canada – Cuba Goodwill Tour in Feb. Rachel Crawford, Emily MacFadyen, Lauren Sweet, Grace Hartling, Emilie Leger and Erin Cowan (Back Row L-R). Camden Rendell, Kyle Hunt, Ryan Trenholm and Emily Cahill (Front Row L-R) Photo: Cyndi Sweeney

Local baseball players are returning to Cuba for the 2015 Canada – Cuba Goodwill Tour in February, but this year, girls will join the boys as ambassadors of the Nova Scotia baseball community.

“It’s about encouraging other kids down there, girls in particular, that baseball’s a great sport and there’s great opportunities with it,” says Mike Crawford, head coach of Hammonds Plains 11U “A” team.

But it’s not all about baseball. More than 200 players travelling to Cuba throughout the month of Feb. will have the opportunity to visit the local school in Matanzas, play baseball with local children and deliver school and baseball supplies.

“We’ll probably be contributing more than $60,000 worth of gear to Matanzas baseball program this year with all the teams that are going,” says Dennis Woodworth, the program development team lead.

Only 40 mins. from the resort village of Varadero, Woodworth says Matanzas is a huge baseball community and provides a safe environment for the players.

“Every team goes for a week and they play four-to-five games. We do a school visit every week and our goal is to donate between $4,000 and $5,000 in school supplies,” says Woodworth, who’s been coaching ball since 1987.

Woodworth coordinates the trips from beginning to end and says the idea was sparked in Varadero three years ago when he was given an opportunity to play ball with other baseball enthusiasts, but wanted to take it a step further.

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Community Herald: Ensuring that each person SOARS

Meet the team at SOARS: Mary Anne Nearing, Anthoney Gough, Tonya Oxford, Shawn O'Connell and Lindsay MacEachern. (L-R).
Meet the team at SOARS: Mary Anne Nearing, Anthoney Gough, Tonya Oxford, Shawn O’Connell and
Lindsay MacEachern. (L-R). “We’ve all been involved in different agencies … and we’ve become aware there isn’t the opportunities for these guys to have multiple day programs to go too. We have a lot of programs that are on waiting lists,” says Nearing.

A ‘people-first’ philosophy and a focus on creating opportunities for individuals living with physical or intellectual challenges, is at the heart of SOARS, which opened on June 28 in Knox United Church in Sackville.

Social Opportunities and Rec Society of Nova Scotia is a not-for-profit society providing day programs, drop-in’s and summer camps for people between age 16 and 35, with a focus on persons deemed with complex case or placement issues.

“We want to have a grassroots, personal approach,” says founder and executive director Anthoney Gough from Middle Sackville. “If you keep people first in all your planning and development at all stages of your programs and activities, then you can’t go wrong.”

The youngest from a family of 16 brothers and sisters, Gough says he learned from an early age that everyone has a variety of strengths and weaknesses and that there are many societal barriers making it difficult for certain members of society, whether minority or ability-based.

“From a very young age, if I could see it, I just tried to do it,” says Gough.

He says he saw the need to help the growing number of people with disabilities awaiting services. “There’s 145 people on wait lists around the metro area and that’s only the tip of the iceberg … many people haven’t applied to wait lists and there’s 16 high schools … so let’s say four kids coming out every year, that’s about 64 kids every year. Where are those 64 going every year?” asks Gough.

Click here for the story.

For more information: www.soarsns.com

Community Herald: Don’t stop the music: Strike a chord for community

There’s a powerful chord resonating from Lower Sackville on Saturday mornings, as a diverse group of musicians converge from all facets of Nova Scotia community life, proving high school graduation shouldn’t be a time to pack away those French horns, clarinets and oboes.

Together, this array of passionate players make Sackville Concert Band, one of Canada’s premiere concert bands, composed of passionate players, retired professional musicians, former Stadacona Band members and music teachers, like band president Tom Rusinak.

“There’s the Symphony, then HMCS Stadacona Band, then us,” says Rusinak. He’s enthusiastic about engaging the Halifax community to come and enjoy their playing, take part in their concerts and embrace music for life.

“A lot of wonderful things have developed out of these band festivals … having professionals sitting with amateurs, the professionals realize why they got involved in music in the first place,” says conductor and music director Laura Mercer of Second Wind Community Concert Band from Cape Breton.

Full story here.

Community Herald: Healthy seniors across the community

CNIB presenting to seniors at Sackville Manor.
CNIB presenting to seniors at Sackville Manor.

Seniors in Sync is a dynamic group of volunteers helping seniors take health into their own hands and building a sense of community along the way.

The idea sparked almost a year and a half ago, said Liz Hamilton, a Bell Aliant Pioneer, while addressing an enthusiastic room of about 30 seniors, gathered in Sackville Manor’s bright common room for an information session on vision.

Along with Helen Mahaney, the two volunteers “became involved with a dynamic trio of women from Sackville Manor; Kay, Barb and Catherine,” said Hamilton.

Here’s the full story.

“With cutbacks with respect to health, we have to be proactive and take health into our own hands,” said Mahaney.