Hammonds Plains ice-skater spins for kids

She spins this weekend in Poland to break the Guinness World Record and has been raising funds for CDN charity for violence-affected youth (Leave Out Violence). Well done Olivia and best of luck!

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Apparently, ‘not her fastest spin’ but it is super impressive! I had the pleasure of interviewing inspiring, local ice-skater, Olivia Oliver.

Passionate and determined, she plans to break the Guinness World Record in Warsaw, Poland, spinning to raise money for children who’ve experienced violence.

Find out in Sept. 23 issue of Community Herald, why she’s attempting more than 5 spins-per-second for 300 rotations in a minute, and who else she’s been helping, all while navigating the waters of elementary school and being a tween.

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Community Herald: Environment, nature at heart of new children’s centre

Prospect Bay Children’s Centre’s official Grand Opening is this Saturday, Nov. 29 from 11am-1pm. Best of luck! @HRMCommunities

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Prospect Bay Children’s Centre owner Lynda Noble stands in the light-flooded Common Room, the heart of her new facilities, in the final weeks before opening her new 5,600 sq.ft. premises. Prospect Bay Children’s Centre owner Lynda Noble stands in the light-flooded Common Room, the heart of her new facilities, in the final weeks before opening her new 5,600 sq.ft. premises.

A view to nature and a commitment to local lies at the foundation of newly built Prospect Bay Children’s Centre, opening its new 5,600 square foot modern, light-flooded premise in early August.

Spanning 7.4 acres of natural landscape, proprietor Lynda Noble says she designed the new location to be an extension of the outside.

“It’s very natural,” says Noble, holding her detailed workback schedule, with 26 years experience at Prospect Bay Children’s Centre and more than 38 years in the business.

Inspired by a work study in Reggio Emilia, Italy, with it’s world-renowned approach to preschool education, Noble says the large, bright ‘Common Room’ is the heart of the building and a style seen throughout the Italian region.

Full story…

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Bedford-Sackville Observer: SPEEDING: EVERYDAY PEOPLE IN EVERYDAY CARS

The arrival of an electronic speed radar sign in Hammonds Plains earlier this month flagged drivers clocking more than 70 km/hr; resulted in numerous speed fines; caused mixed reactions; and raised the question, what is Citizens on Patrol?

“I think it was a great addition to community,” says Marty Robar, resident of Highland Park. The speed sign was recently placed near Robar’s house on Pinetree Cres. where his dog was hit earlier this year.

“Hopefully it will spur people to watch their speed limits, although there was already an unfortunate incident where someone in the community was bragging they got it up over 60 km/h,” says Robar.

For the full story including details about COP and local input click here.

Dartmouth Tribune: A family’s journey to gluten-free

Gluten-free and dairy-free baker Iain Downey prepares icing for one of his pumpkin-spice bundt cakes.
Gluten-free and dairy-free baker Iain Downey prepares icing for one of his pumpkin-spice bundt cakes.

A gluten-free diet is yielding more than a fresh batch of health for a local family from Dartmouth, inspired to share their story following a recent Community Herald column, “The real truth behind gluten,” written by Michelle MacLean.

Heather Downey and her family made the shift to gluten-free 17 years ago, long before supermarkets designated entire sections to gluten-free products; a time when variety was limited to loaves of tasteless, cardboard-like bread. The shift began an inspiring journey for their nine-year-old son Iain, who has Asperger Syndrome and high functioning autism.

“When he was nine there was a lot of back and forth on the internet about whether a gluten-free diet made a difference in our children. There were claims that children became more sociable and interacted more with others after going gluten-free,” recalls Downey. “We were always looking for interventions, anything that might help Iain, so we figured it’s not going to hurt to try it.”

Read Downey’s story here.

“For a nine-year-old whose tummy always hurt, to a six-foot young man who is rarely ill, a gluten-free diet has been worth the journey … We are all healthier because of it. ” says Downey.

Until the website is launched, inquiries to purchase Downey’s baked goods can made at www.facebook.com/IainsIncredibleEdibles.

Halifax Citizen: Crafting a Maritime Christmas

Christmas baubles filled with tiny pieces of driftwood, shells and sea glass by Rita Laidlaw of Sea Glass Design from Dartmouth.
Christmas baubles filled with tiny pieces of driftwood, shells and sea glass by Rita Laidlaw of Sea Glass Design from Dartmouth.

Searching for that uniquely crafted Nova Scotian gift this holiday season, but missed Christmas At The Forum?

Fear not, many of these crafters will showcase their wares at the upcoming Dalplex Christmas Craft Market and their homespun flare can add a touch of maritime magic to a season often filled with commercially packaged, over-produced products.

Handmade wooden games and crafts by Ken Grandy of Uncle Ken’s Woodwork displayed at Christmas At The Forum on Nov. 7.
Handmade wooden games and crafts by Ken Grandy of Uncle Ken’s Woodwork displayed at Christmas At The Forum on Nov. 7.

Wooden Games
“I love games,” says Ken Grandy of Uncle Ken’s Woodwork in Lawrencetown. Grandy hand carves his games locally and sells them on Kijiji under the name UKW.

“I have washer toss and the jenga game, called Stacked, goes up to six feet tall,” says Grandy.

For the full story see the Halifax Citizen.

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Crocheted hats by Gabs & Eddy are for everyone in the family, even the furry members. Gillian Allen crochets her hats at her studio in Fall River

“We’re taking orders up to about the fourth of December, depending on where it has to be shipped … we also do gift cards,” says Allen.

A portion of every doggie hat sale goes to Bide Awhile animal shelter in Dartmouth. People can purchase at her home studio, by appointment or visit http://www.GabsandEddy.com.

Beachy gifts, forgotten treasures and seaside jewels

Traditional Marine harnesses quintessential maritime, selling everything from mermaids, to cod jigs and hand painted ores. The family business is based in Annapolis Royal, but despite the distance, owner John Edelmann says they sell their products online at http://www.traditionalmarine.com, shipping around the province. “We paint paddles in varying colours starting from about $40, and we also do the buoys,” says Byron Edelmann.

A little glow for the holidays

Dalplex Christmas Craft Market takes place Nov. 28 to Nov. 30. in Halifax.

Bedford-Sackville Observer: LOCAL MOM LEADING WOMEN IN BUSINESS

Nominated in the Micro Business category for an RBC Womens Entrepreneur Award, Pamela Streeter says it's a highlight of her career.
Creative Kids Education Centre and Birch Hills Academy owner and entrepreneur, Pamela Streeter says being a finalist nominee in the Micro-Business category of the RBC Canadian Women Entrepreneur Award signifies, “small businesses can have a big impact within the community … this is really the highlight of my career in terms of recognition.”

Innovation, inspiration and advice from one of Canada’s leading female entrepreneurs.

A local entrepreneur and educator from Hammonds Plains is one of 18 finalists from across Canada, nominated for a 2014 RBC Canadian Women Entrepreneur Award (CWEA).

From 4,000 nominees, Pamela Streeter, executive director of Creative Kids Education Centre and Birch Hills Academy, is one of three regional finalists, and is nominated for a Micro-Business Award at the national ceremony celebrating leading Canadian female entrepreneurs.

Streeter has been setting successful lives in motion for more than 25 years, with a focus on delivering reading, learning and socializing skills through her preschool, elementary, middle school, school-age and day camp programs.

Q: What inspired your entrepreneurial path?

Streeter:
“I’m a mother of three children. I had always seen myself as being at home with my children. Fortunately my field of expertise was in early education. When my children were really young and I wanted to contribute more to my family, and also to challenge myself, I opened up a preschool in my home.

When my children started school, two of them didn’t learn to read in the public school system. It started me on this investigation as to why that was, what we could do better, how could I help them. I learned we can do this easily.

I started implementing pre-reading strategies into our early learning programs. Parents would come back and reinforce the need existed. I was an entrepreneur prior to that, but it helped shape the path I took. Offering the reading through a school setting seemed to make sense.

I also noticed the children who need a more skills-based method of learning to read, have a brain that’s often very creative. So where they often excel is, in the Fine Arts. By offering the fine arts earlier on, they have classes where they can really shine and feel confident.”

Streeters advice to local women entrepreneurs and her thoughts on the nomination in the Halifax Citizen.

The 22nd annual RBC CWEA recognizes women entrepreneurs who make impressive contributions to their local, Canadian or global economy. Winners will be announced an awards gala in Toronto on Nov. 26.