Bowling for futures: Building Futures Charlie Dunn Bowl-a-thon

Bowlathon2The annual Charlie-Dunn Bowl-a-thon Fundraiser took place this weekend at Sackville’s spectacular Super Bowl.  It was their biggest turn out ever and it was a great day!

Event organizers Sarah Hunt and Jennifer Pauley
Event organizers Sarah Hunt and Jennifer Pauley

We can’t wait to hear what they raised, and are really proud of our eight young gals who fundraised over $1,000 in support of Building Futures Employment Society to help work towards a society where students with intellectual disabilities don’t graduate to wait lists and have equal access to supported employment.

The girls want to thank their two local sponsors: TD Canada Trust and Subway, Cobequid and for pledging their big day!

High score kids bowler went to Fantabulous Four’s Autumn Sweeney and most sportsmanlike went to Ally Cat Striker’s Erin Strite. Well done girls!Autumn & Eri

The Building Futures Employment Society (formerly Anchor) have held a bowl-a-thon for more than 10 years to raise money to support our programs such as literacy, job readiness, and employment support.

“The Charlie Dunn Bowl-A-Thon is a community event that is a fun opportunity for the FUTURES team and our community to join together to support services that engage people with intellectual disabilities in employment and other community options,” says Marilyn Forrest, Director, Building Futures Employment Society.

The Bowl-A-Thon was renamed in 2011 in honour of Charlie Dunn. Charlie was part of the FUTURES team for many years. He was a friend and mentor to everyone with whom he worked. He believed in what we do and promoted us in the local community. Charlie was our most enthusiastic and committed fundraiser. He was in many ways the face of FUTURES in our community.

Community Herald: B.U.I.L.D: teens push harder for better tomorrow

High-energy techno fills a room at Fairview Junior High, transforming the class every Thursday into a circuit-style gym with body bars, a punching bag and yoga mats. A student leader bellows a countdown to a room of about 12 sweaty teenagers. It could be boot camp, but there’s far too many smiles.

“We’ve discussed peer pressure and drugs…he’s taught us to have respect in your life and to just treat people the way you want to be treated,” says Bret Piercey.

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Find the full story on Community Herald.

Ellsworth is hoping to run a summer B.U.I.L.D. program in Fairview and Citadel Hill. For information email Dustin.ellsworth@live.com.

Community Herald: Tribute paid to Woodbine Family for ensuring hot meals to seniors since 2007

MLA Stephen Gough with Woodbine Family Assoc. volunteers Barb Burke, Kathy Fougere and Mureena Hebert and Counc. Brad Johns (Sackville - Beaver Bank) at Brown Hall in Beaver Bank. (L-R)
MLA Stephen Gough with Woodbine Family Assoc. volunteers Barb Burke, Kathy Fougere and Mureena Hebert and Counc. Brad Johns (Sackville – Beaver Bank) at Brown Hall in Beaver Bank. (L-R)

A small group of dedicated volunteers were recognized for their tireless community spirit in front of a bustling table-filled room in Beaver Bank last week. The Woodbine Family Association has been dishing-up hot meals to seniors for more than seven years.

By 11 a.m. the little room in Brown Hall, along Beaver Bank Rd. was almost full with hungry locals enjoying home-cooked liver, onions and bacon, spinach salad and vegetables, followed by dessert, for a meager $5.

“We do a lot for people…Kathy started it about seven-years-ago with a government grant and her whole idea was, there are seniors out there who cannot afford a hot meal,” said Barb Burke, one of the eight volunteers being awarded certificates of recognition by MLA Stephen Gough (Sackville-Beaver Bank).

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Read: Expressing Gratitude in Community Herald.

Bus Stop Blog: Kiwanis Music Festival culminates with a ‘firestorm’ performance at MSVU

IMG_6309The bus stopped outside Mount Saint Vincent University today, filled with Grade six band students from Hammonds Plains, to perform in the Nova Scotia Kiwanis Music Festival.

IMG_6339Band instructor Barbara Hopkin conducted all three performing bands which included Kingswood Elementary, Madeline Symonds Middle School and John W. MacLeod.

The bands performed two pieces, including a heavy percussion piece, Firestorm. The festival kicked off the end of March, featuring about 12 bands per day and culminates this week.

 “It serves the early stages of kids playing, which is really important and is the wonderful thing about the festival,” said adjudicator Mark Hopkins from Acadia University.

Hear Kingswood Elementary performing Firestorm:

Adjudicator Hopkins told the tuba players to, ‘keep playing’ — that they showed great talent on the brass.

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Community Herald: To market we will go

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Get excited Nova Scotian market goers, there’s a new kid in town. The new source for local produce, products and freshly prepared meals is at Knox Church in Lower Sackville, re-opening its doors Saturday’s from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. beginning May 17.

 

“It’s a great family fun day on Saturday mornings for the community, not only for Sackville, but also for Bedford, Dartmouth, Hammonds Plains … it’s for anybody who wants to come out,” says market founder Pamela Lovelace.

 

Steve and Donna Hopper of Ashwurks Kitchen Accessories with Sackville Farmers’ Market founder Pamela Lovelace and Creative Gourmet owner Chef Lyle Kennedy at Knox Church in Lower Sackville, where the new market will open on May 17. (L-R)
Steve and Donna Hopper of Ashwurks Kitchen Accessories with Sackville Farmers’ Market founder Pamela Lovelace and Creative Gourmet owner Chef Lyle Kennedy at Knox Church in Lower Sackville, where the new market will open on May 17. (L-R)

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Read about it here.

Community Herald: Project COLORS plants seeds of change

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A small humanitarian society along the eastern shore of Nova Scotia has spread it’s wings, since sparking to life, quite by happenstance, 10 years ago when a young woman from Lawrencetown was travelling overseas during a “gap year.”

Sunyata Choyce, founder of Project COLORS, had no way of knowing her decision to detour to a South African orphanage, home to 55 aids orphans, would catapult her into the full-time life as a NGO worker.

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Read the article here.

“If I let every little thing that backfired stop me from helping with Project COLORS , then so many kids wouldn’t have water, wouldn’t have gone to school, the teachers wouldn’t have had the Early Child Care education training, all those schools all over the world wouldn’t have these first aid kits … you have to look at the bigger picture. If you try a few things, something is bound to work out,” says Choyce.

Community Herald: Don’t be afraid to go to great heights, overcome fears

“If you’re afraid, than you’re in the wrong room.”

Those were the opening remarks to an energized crowd, as Henk van Leeuwen, CEO of Easter Seals Nova Scotia and Scott Jones of Don’t Be Afraid, announced their alliance and the kickoff of the countdown to The Drop Zone 2014.

“Scott’s cause is our cause and his message is our message…it’s about being free of fear to be yourself, it’s about being ok and being empowered to be yourself everyday…regardless of the color of your skin, or your sexual orientation or your faith,” said van Leeuwen during the press conference.

 “Challenge yourself and change lives” is the mission at Easter Seals.  “There’s such power and leverage in strategic alliances, we’re helping to promote each others campaign…ultimately, I think we’re the same campaign,” said van Leeuwen.

Read about in the Community Herald.